Speakers

Raeywen Connell

Raewyn Connell is Professor Emerita, University of Sydney, and Life Member of the National Tertiary Education Union in Australia. She has taught in several countries and is a well-known sociological researcher, who has recently received the International Sociological Association's quadrennial Award for Excellence in Research and Practice. Her work has been translated into twenty-four languages. She is a well-known researcher on gender and sexuality, her books in this field includeMasculinities, Gender & Power, and Gender in World Perspective. Her five books on educational issues include Making the Difference, Schools & Social Justice, and The Good University. Details at www.raewynconnell.net and Twitter @raewynconnell.

Abstract: About Sexuality Education

Sexuality is, primarily, a source of joy and connection for people in all societies, a means of reproduction for the human world, and of pleasure for the persons involved. Yet sexuality is often a source of cultural trouble. It was a concern of women's liberation and gay liberation, and of the backlashes to those movements, including the current 'anti-gender' campaigns. Sexuality is also a site of violence, child abuse and sexual harassment. Sexuality education has widely been censored and constrained. Yet we know that most parents wish for good sexuality education for their children in the schools.

It is important that new initiatives should focus on the needs of the children. The idea that children and adolescents should be 'protected' from sexuality serves them badly. We need to study young people's own worlds, which have many sources of information about sexuality. Young people are constantly exploring their own bodies, living in relationship to others, constructing masculinities and femininities. We need to consider their changing capacities and readiness as they grow, and recognize their resources, desires, and agency in learning.

In the past, girls have been marginal in sexuality research, and must be a focus in innovation for sexuality education. But boys must also be closely considered, and changing patterns of masculinity offer educational possibilities. Special thought needs to be given to the needs of children in precarious situations, including those bullied or abused in gendered ways.

Professional issues for teachers need attention. It is important to widen curriculum, not to downgrade biology and health but to link those issues to their social contexts. Curricula need to address relationship education, especially for adolescents; also coercion, sexual abuse, and problems of development. Developing good resources and guidelines for teachers and teacher education is critical, and I hope will be a site of creative and far-reaching work.

Louisa Allen

Louisa Allen is a Professor, in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland. She has spent 24 years researching young people, sexualities and schooling to understand how schools offer messages to students about gender and sexual identities via the official and unofficial curriculum. This work has involved an exploration of the missing discourse of desire and inclusion of pleasure in sexuality education programmes and young people’s perspectives about this content. Another special interest for Louisa has been the way in which schools can be understood as heteronormative spaces that centre heterosexuality and marginalise queer identities and issues. In her current work, she continues to explore ways in which pedagogy and school cultures can be more inclusive of sexual, gender, religious and cultural diversity and broach sexuality issues in ways that are meaningful to young people. A prolific author, she has published 7 books in these areas, the most recent of which is entitled ‘Breathing Life into Sexuality Education’ published by Palgrave in 2021.

Abstract: Including Pleasure in Sexuality Education: Possibilities and Perils

The inclusion of pleasure and desire have been important in the vision of sexuality education for more than 30 years (Fine, 1988; Rasmussen, Rofes, Talburt, 2004; McGeeney & Kehily, 2016; Singh et al., 2021). This presentation continues this conversation by exploring young people’s interest and ideas about incorporating pleasure within sexuality education at school. Drawing on empirical data from focus group and survey methods young people highlight some of the possibilities and perils of including this topic as a curricula component. Participants felt sexual pleasure was relevant to their lives and displayed a significant interest in receiving this information provided it was delivered in a particular format. Responses provide insights into some of the politics which surround the inclusion of pleasure in sexuality education and challenges faced in operationalising such a topic. Taking into account young people’s perspectives, this keynote encourages an acknowledgement and interrogation of these politics and their implications for what gets ‘taught’ as pleasure in sexuality programmes.

Deevia Bhana

Deevia Bhana is the DSI/NRF South African Research Chair in Gender and Childhood Sexuality. She is known for the large international fields of study crossing the sociology of childhood and youth studies, schooling with particular focus on gender and sexuality across the young life course. In addressing an area of high significance, Deevia Bhana’s research operates at the very frontiers of knowledge, bringing a broad theoretical social science lens, and challenging scholarship from across the world through her empirical material, theoretical reflection and development, and positionality in South Africa.

Deevia Bhana and her team’s research derive from a gender justice framework which interweaves with overlapping concerns around sexuality, race, class and age with great impact for redressing structural-social- gender inequalities. Her focus on young sexualities, the early formation of gender ideologies and violence and her interests in sexual/reproductive health and young families foregrounds the material-symbolic-discursive forces and is touched by new feminist materialism in understanding young people’s sexual agency.

As Research Chair Deevia Bhana is actively involved in supervising a large cohort of students and has a significant impact in building the research profile of the next generation of young scholars in the field of gender, childhood sexualities and schooling.

Abstract: Comprehensive Sexuality Education and Young Children: Needed and Denied

Young children in the early years of the life course are often confronted with heinous conditions revolving around structural and historical inequalities that manifest in high rates of sexual violence. While young boys are not immune from sexual molestation and violence, girls in particular have been shown to remain ‘at risk’ in the context of sexual violence, harassment and young age. Of particular relevance are unequal gender relations, generational hierarchies and cultural norms which make it difficult for girls to negotiate their sexual well-being. Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) is much needed and of critical importance to the development of young people’s sexualities. But, their access to sexual knowledge is also framed as "risky" as a result of the panic that sexualities invoke in relation to childhood. In this discussion I focus on two main issues: the context through which children’s sexualities is produced and second the contradiction between the need to know sex and adult prescripts which are built around providing little or no knowledge about sexuality which impacts on the provision of CSE to young children. I argue that the denial of CSE to young children is long outdated and it is time to establish new expanded ways of working with young children that includes a comprehensive focus on genders and sexualities.

Lucas Platero

Lucas Platero combina su tarea como profesor de psicología social en la URJC con su labor como editor en Edicions Bellaterra. Estudió Psicología, es doctor en CC. Políticas y Sociología y sus líneas de trabajo incluyen la sexualidad no normativa, las intersecciones de las diferentes formas de exclusión y la pedagogía transformadora. Acaba de recibir el premio Emma Goldman (Flax Foundation) y es miembro de los equipos de investigación AFIN y Fractalidades de la Investigación Crítica. Sus últimos libros publicado son: “Cuerpos Marcados. Vidas que cuentan y políticas públicas” (Bellaterra 2019) y (h)amor 6 trans (Continta Me Tienes 2021).



Abstract: Herramientas para construir la escuela que soñamos

En la actualidad, aunque tenemos programas de igualdad de género y protocolos educativos para proteger a la infancia y juventud LGTB+ en todas las comunidades autónomas, también nos enfrentamos a un contexto donde las voces más conservadoras y de la ultraderecha piden que se saque de la escuela todo contenido que apoye la igualdad de género y la educación sexual. En esta presentación abordaremos las herramientas que permiten imaginar una escuela libre de discriminación, que surgen de las pedagogías feministas, antirracistas, decoloniales y que apoyan el libre desarrollo de la infancia LGTBQ+, entre otras.

Cory Silverberg

Raised in the 1970s by a children’s librarian and a sex therapist, Cory grew up to be a sex educator, and author, and a queer person who smiles a lot when they talk. They spend a lot of their time reading, writing, and talking about sex and gender and are happiest working with others. Cory was a founding member of the Come As You Are Co-operative and worked as a researcher and television consultant in Canada for over 10 years. Cory is a core team member of ANTE UP!, a virtual professional freedom school.

Cory is the co-author of four books including The Ultimate Guide to Sex and Disability (with Fran Odette and Miriam Kaufman), What Makes a Baby, Sex Is a Funny Word, and the forthcoming You Know, Sex, all with Fiona Smyth.

Degree in education at the University of Toronto, Cory has developed and facilitated workshops for hundreds of agencies and organizations serving both youth and adults across North America on a range of topics including gender expression and identity, sexuality and disability, sexual pleasure, sexual communication, technology, and access + inclusion.

Abstract: If You Want to Know, Ask: The Sex and Gender Education We Need

Most sex education curricula prioritizes, and grounds itself in, bio-medical knowledge and bio-medical understandings of gender and sexuality. But sex and gender are not experienced primarily as bio-medical phenomenon. They are relational and experiential. Sex education based in bio-medical representations and understandings of gender and sexuality is a sex education removed from the context of children’s lives. The sex education we need is one grounded in the lived experience of its learners. This is as true for 10-year-olds as it is for 70-year-olds.

In this keynote, author and sex educator Cory Silverberg will talk about their experiences over a decade of writing child-centered sex and gender education books for children ages 4 and up. They’ll talk about how we can take gender out of where it doesn’t belong and make sure it’s in the places it does, and they’ll talk about the challenges of writing and teaching about a topic that everyone knows something about, even though no one agrees on what it is. In doing this, Silverberg will describe what sex education that centers young people's experience can be.

Begonya Enguix

Begonya Enguix Grau es licenciada en Antropología Americana (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, UCM) y doctora en Antropología Social y Cultural (Universitat Rovira i Virgili, URV). Es profesora agregada de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) donde coordina el Grado URV-UOC de Antropología y Evolución Humana. Dirige las conferencias internacionales Men in Movement (MIM). En 2019, ganó la cátedra invitada Aigner-Rollett para estudios de mujeres y género en la Karl-Franzens Universität de Graz (Austria), a la que sigue vinculada como profesora visitante. También coordina el grupo de investigación consolidado "Medusa: Géneros en Transición: masculinidades, afectos, cuerpos y tecnociencia".

Especializada en antropología del género (masculinidades), del cuerpo, de las sexualidades, las identidades y los afectos y sus relaciones con los medios y la acción política, a lo largo de su trayectoria ha participado en proyectos de investigación nacionales e internacionales sobre temas como migraciones, cuerpos, masculinidades, identidades digitales o minorías LGBTIQ.

Abstract: Posthumanismo, cuerpo y género: miradas enredadas

La crítica al antropocentrismo, al especismo, al androcentrismo, al dualismo y a la construcción ilustrada de lo humano que caracterizan al Posthumanismo no serían posibles sin su perspectiva profundamente feminista y ética. Buena parte de las teóricas posthumanistas han desarrollado sus ideas a partir de la crítica a un sistema de género centrado en lo masculino como modelo universal de lo humano. El posthumanismo, si es algo, es un momento de ruptura, de redefinición, de incertidumbre. Un cambio de mirada; una oportunidad.

La crítica posthumanista nos empuja a repensar el género pero también el modo como entendemos el cuerpo y la sexualidad. Su aproximación afirmativa y crítica muestra que género, sexualidad y cuerpo nos sirven para construir identidades y vínculos sociales que están atravesados por otras categorías como la edad.

En esta charla, hablaré de las aproximaciones posthumanistas y nuevo materialistas a cuerpos, sexualidades y géneros y de las transformaciones o desplazamientos en nuestro modo de mirar estas realidades que estas aproximaciones facilitan o pueden facilitar. Tratar cuerpos, sexualidades y géneros como parte de un ensamblaje complejo, nos abre a pensar estos elementos en su permanente devenir, en permanente relación y sin establecer determinaciones cerradas entre ellos. Abre los cuerpos al mundo más allá de las determinaciones y condicionantes biológicos. Nos abre a imaginar conceptualizaciones diversas del cuerpo, la sexualidad y los afectos que nos permiten pensarnos desde posiciones no binarias ni excluyentes.

Considerar que el género y la sexualidad siempre están cosidos a cuerpos, sitúa el cuerpo como un elemento fundamental de nuestro ser y estar en el mundo y nos lleva a tomar conciencia de que cuando hablamos de cuerpo, sexualidad y género, siempre hablamos de identidad y de política.

Camino Baró

Camino Baró San Frutos. Psicóloga general sanitaria. Experta en terapia familiar sistémica. Especializada en acompañamiento psicológico a personas con diversidad sexoafectiva y de género. Colaboradora de Lasexología.com. Miembro de GRAPSIA (grupo de apoyo a personas con insensibilidad a los andrógenos y condiciones relacionadas). Secretaria de Asociación Intersex KALEIDOS de ámbito estatal. Autora de la publicación Un secreto pelirrojo (Editorial Bellaterra) y de Intersexualidades: una mirada terapéutica a la infancia y juventud (en Ainhoa Rodríguez García de Cortázar, Mar Venegas, Infancia y juventud: retos sociales y para la democracia (pp.209-216). Tirant lo Blanch). Activista en primera persona por los derechos de las personas intersexuales. Participante de formaciones sobre intersexualidades en la Universidad de Granada, País Vasco, Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Universidad de Buenos Aires.

Abstract: La realidad intersexual en educación

La letra I probablemente sea de las más desconocidas e invisibilizadas del acrónimo LGTBIAQ+. Esta realidad cala en el contexto educativo que conforma un desierto formativo en lo que respecta a contenidos sobre diversidad corporal. El ocultismo y el secretismo dificultan el proceso de identificación positiva con una condición que poseen entre un 0´5% y un 1,7% de la población, según la ficha de las Naciones Unidas del año 2018.

Del mismo modo, y de la mencionada invisibilidad de la intersexualidad, "el profesorado todavía parece reacio a contrarrestar activamente el heterosexismo y los temas LGBTIQ en las escuelas, ya que su conocimiento y comprensión sobre estes estudiantes y sus necesidades parecen limitados para proporcionarles un entorno escolar y de aprendizaje más inclusivo" (Brömdal et al. 2017, 373).

Les estudiantes poseedores de una condición intersexual padecen un daño significativo: son objeto de desconocimiento, ignorancia, indiferencia, estigmatización, señalamiento, discriminación, maltrato, violencia, abuso, vergüenza y negación de su existencia en los espacios escolares. También en la educación sexual.

Esto ocurre especialmente cuando su estatura, experiencia puberal u otros elementos de la apariencia corporal no se ajustan a la expresión de género convencional, a la pubertad o a las nociones binarias de las características sexuales asociadas a los cuerpos masculinos o femeninos, lo que provoca graves problemas psicológicos (Breu 2009; Brömdal et al. 2017; Ghattas 2015; Jones 2016; Jones et al).

Para combatir este sesgo endonormativo en la docencia existen recursos y herramientas que podemos emplear, desde la escucha de testimonios en primera persona, hacer uso de medios audiovisuales, entrenamiento en ejercicios que cuestionen nuestras creencias, etc.

El ámbito educativo parece, así, una oportunidad privilegiada para generar ese escenario en el que la persona con una condición intersexual se empodere promoviendo su afirmación y reconocimiento, evitando la negación y el estigma.

Carlos de la Cruz

Doctor en Psicología y Sexólogo. Impulsor y actualmente Director Honorífico del Máster en Sexología UCJC, tanto en su versión oficial y presencial como en el formato a distancia. Colabora en otros másteres como Máster en Integración de personas con discapacidad-Calidad de vida de la Universidad de Salamanca, Máster de Psiconcología y Máster Universitario en Estudios LGBTIQ+ de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, , Máster Trastornos del Espectro del Autismo GATEA de la Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, entre otros.

Vicepresidente de la Asociación Estatal Sexualidad y Discapacidad y Asesor de Plena inclusión España para temas de Sexualidad. Coordinador del proyecto “Sexualidades que importan” junto con Plena Madrid y la Fundación GMP y colaborador de múltiples entidades: Confederación ASPACE, ASPAYM, FEDER, FEDACE, Autismo España, etc. Autor de varios libros sobre sexualidad y discapacidad, sexología y cuentos infantiles.

Abstract: Discapacidad y Educación Sexual o cómo acceder al palacio real y contribuir a construir cuartos donde patinar

Con demasiada frecuencia la única estrategia ante la sexualidad de las personas con discapacidad ha sido el silencio, que sumado a la infantilización y a la sobreprotección ha dado como resultado el cero más absoluto: “las personas con discapacidad no tiene sexualidad o su sexualidad no es importante”

Afortunadamente esto ha empezado a cambiar. Lo exigen muchas familias, las entidades y, sobre todo, las propias personas con discapacidad. La Educación Sexual no es opcional porque tampoco lo es su sexualidad. No hay que esperar a que haga falta, es necesaria desde el minuto uno. Es necesaria desde la infancia. Es una cuestión de derechos, de ética, de calidad de vida y de sentido común y, sobre todo, de coherencia. ¿Se podría hablar de inclusión si se excluye una dimensión de las personas?

No obstante también es importante no atravesar por atajos, justificándonos por aquello de que llegamos tarde, o hacer de la Educación Sexual un remedio para cuando se presentan problemas. La Educación Sexual en personas con discapacidad, sea cual sea y en cualquier momento evolutivo, ha de tener objetivos amplios. Justo los mismos que para el resto de personas: conocerse, aceptarse y expresar la erótica de manera que genere satisfacción o bienestar.

Para todo ello es imprescindible que, familiares y profesionales, cultiven los mínimos imprescindibles que han de permitir que todas las personas lleguen a sus máximos. Esos mínimos son: información y educación sexual, intimidad, consideración hacia su cuerpo y su pudor, autonomía y autodeterminación, identidad de género y orientación sexual, relaciones personales, apoyos necesarios y enfoque y perspectiva de género.

¿Los máximos? Hasta donde cada persona con discapacidad quiera y pueda llegar, con toda su diversidad y todas sus peculiaridades. Con pareja o sin pareja. El límite: el horizonte. Lo que implica dar apoyos precisos en cada momento.

val flores

Escritora y activista de la disidencia sexual lesbiana feminista prosexo masculina. Profesora en Educación Primaria. Como una maestra apasionada por la teoría sin filiación académica, una trabajadora de la palabra seducida por la opacidad barroca, y una feminista que hurga en los desechos de los discursos demasiado seguros de sí mismos, se dedica a la escritura ensayística/poética y a la realización de talleres y performances como modos de intervención estético-política-pedagógica. Actualmente reside en la ciudad de La Plata (Argentina). Fue integrante del grupo de activismo artístico-político de lesbianas feministas “fugitivas del desierto” en la ciudad de Neuquén (Argentina), durante 2004-2008. Formó parte del equipo creador de Potencia Tortillera, archivo digitalizado del activismo lésbico de Argentina (2011-2015). Entre sus últimas publicaciones se encuentran: Tropismos de la disidencia (2017); F(r)icciones pedagógicas. Escrituras, sexualidades y educación, junto a Agustina Peláez (2017); Una lengua cosida de relámpagos (2019); Romper el corazón del mundo. Modos fugitivos de hacer teoría (2021).

Abstract: ¿Cuál es el sueño sexual de la ESI? Escritura, poder e imaginación

¿Con qué sueños sexuales estamos comprometidxs cuando escribimos? ¿Se puede ensanchar nuestra imaginación sexual si no interferimos los modos binarios de escritura escolar? ¿Qué gestos mínimos rompen los pactos cis-heterosexualizantes de escritura en la institución escolar? Me propongo ensayar algunas preguntas para pensar la ESI como una oportunidad para convertirnos en investigadorxs de nuestras propias prácticas pedagógicas, sexuales, genéricas, eróticas, escriturales. Una aventura de la sensibilidad feminista y cuir desde una posición prosexo como marco para problematizar la fuerza heterosexualizante de la cultura escolar. Una aventura apasionada que hace de la pregunta el pulso erótico de la creación y destrucción del saber, que arriesga la imaginación como campo densificado de poder y asume las prácticas de escritura como un gesto capilar que puede desorganizar las tramas normativas que articulan nuestro pensamiento sexual.

Teo Pardo

Activista trans y feminista. Forma parte del activismo trans de la ciudad de Barcelona desde el 2006. Experto en educación sexual feminista con peques y grandes. Entre el 2015 y el 2020 ha sido formador dentro del proyecto Sexualitats, de la entidad Sida Studi, sobre educación sexual feminista en la infancia, la adolescencia y la edad adulta. En la actualidad es profesor de biología de secundaria para el Departamento de Educación de Cataluña y formador para diferentes entidades e instituciones. Ha colaborado en diversas antologías transfeministas como: Transfeminismos: fricciones, epistemes y flujos (2013), coordinado por Elena Urko y Miriam Solá, y (h)amor 6 trans (2021), coordinado por Lucas Platero. También ha coescrito diversas guías de la colección “Claves reflexivas para la educación sexual”, publicadas por el proyecto Sexualitats, de Sida Studi.

Abstract: Poner el cuerpo: hacer educación sexual desde una experiencia trans y feminista

Tradicionalmente se ha asumido que en el ámbito pedagógico, llevar lo personal al aula era poco profesional, especialmente si aquello personal se desviaba de las prescripciones normativas en relación a los cuerpos y los deseos. Desde mi experiencia de ser un hombre trans con mirada feminista haciendo educación sexual en primaria y secundaria, me he preguntado muchas veces cómo hacer para que las intervenciones sobre sexualidad no fueran cisheterocentradas ni reprodujeran lógicas patriarcales, y al mismo tiempo, para que interesara y atrapara a todo el alumnado. Las mejores estrategias que he encontrado han sido, por un lado, que el eje vertebrador de las intervenciones sea el placer, conectar al alumnado con el placer en un sentido muy extenso, ampliar sus imaginarios… Y por el otro, llevar estratégicamente mi experiencia al aula. Esta herramienta ha resultado, no solo una muy buena forma de introducir referentes cercanos diversos en el aula, sino también una forma preciosa de generar complicidades y de repensar la noción de autoridad en la educación, revelando así que lo personal no es sólo político, sino también radicalmente pedagógico.

Maria González

Maria Gonzalez Aran (Barcelona, 1990) activista feminista, psicóloga y responsable de el área de intervención comunitaria de l’ Associació pels Drets Sexuals i Reproductius. Trabaja en el ámbito de la educación afectivo sexual con jóvenes, profesionales de distintos servicios y famílias. También ha participado en diversos proyectos dde creación de materiales o contenidos como el “Programa Coeuca’t” del Departament d’Educació.

Por otra parte, también lleva a cabo proyectos de abordaje de las violencias machistas y trabajo de defensa de los derechos sexuales y reproducivos con mujeres, desde la acción comunitaria.

Abstract: El programa Coeduca’t: experiencia en la elaboración e implementación de un programa transversal

La defensa de la educación afectivo sexual como derecho es imprescindible situarla desde la reivindicación de su garantía universal. El acceso desigual a las formaciones y recursos en este ámbito puede acabar conduciendo a la generación de mayores desigualdades en el alumnado desde la primera infancia. Por ello, es imprescindible poder garantizar un acceso igualitario a la educación afectivo sexual desde todos los centros, sin depender de los intereses o la motivación de unos profesionales o equipos en concreto.

En este sentido, el Programa Coeduca’t, del Departament d’Educació de la Generalitat de Catalunya supone una gran oportunidad para incorporar de forma transversal la educación sexual desde la primera infancia desde una mirada inclusiva, feminista y basada en los derechos sexuales y reproductivos. Desde el CJAS, a través de la experiencia tras años de realizar intervenciones con jóvenes en las aulas, hemos podido colaborar en la elaboración del itinerario curricular para incorporar los distintos contenidos, habilidades y competencias desde los 3 hasta los 16 años, elaborando un recorrido a través de ejes temáticos como el autoconocimiento, el placer, los derechos o los autocuidados, entre otros.

Así pues, la experiencia actual se basa en la incorporación del programa en los centros educativos, acompañando los diversos agentes de la comunidad educativa en su formación e incorporación de las premisas de la educación afectivo sexual en su cotidianidad, estableciendo estrategias y mecanismos de continuidad.

Miguel Ángel López

Miguel es doctor en psicología por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente investigador y profesor en el Departamento de Psicología (Área de Psicología Social) de la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. Ha realizado estancias especializadas en género y movimientos sociales en la Freie Universität, la Simon Fraser University y la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Su trayectoria profesional se ha dedicado a las áreas de infancia y adolescencia e intervención social en los ámbitos de género, atención a la diversidad afectivo-sexual y violencia sexual y de género. En los últimos años, ha coordinado proyectos de investigación feminista, infancia trans* y reflexión sobre las masculinidades. Forma parte de las redes activistas de denuncia de acoso sexual y género. También participa en distintos grupos de investigación relacionados con las políticas de salud pública y las epistemologías feministas.

Abstract: Superando las LGBTfobias, compromisos con la alianza

La educación es clave para promover la comprensión y el desarrollo de identidades heterogéneas que respeten y defiendan las diversidades sexo-genéricas. Multitud de estudios indican la importancia de educar para generar espacios seguros y fomentar el entendimiento entre distintos. En contraposición, dentro del discurso político se alzan voces defensoras del derecho a no saber. 'Derecho' que ignora, desdeña y niega las violencias que sufren las personas LGBTQ, posibilidad de una posición evasiva de 'supuesta neutralidad' a los sujetos de privilegio e impide su reconocimiento. Así, la falta de educación no implica una ausencia sin más, sino que es performativa para crear espacios de inseguridad e impedir la generación de personas aliadas con el LGBTQ. Para generar una cultura real de alianza de toda la comunidad (especialmente heterosexual) resulta esencial la incorporación de formación específica en temas LGBTQ. Esta formación no sólo debe incluir la comprensión de las realidades y necesidades de las personas LGBTQ, sino que debe procurarse una reflexión sobre las posiciones de privilegio heterosexual y la necesidad de una implicación comprometida política-personalmente ante las violencias.

Ingrid Agud

PhD. lecturer of Education Sciences at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. She teaches in the degrees of Gender Socio-Cultural studies and Primary Education; and in the Master’s Degree on Educational Research.

Her research focuses on educational inequalities, particularly in the intersections of gender, sexuality, age, and origin with an approach from the feminist critical pedagogy, gender studies and queer theory and the use of qualitative, ethnographic, collaborative methodologies. She is the coordinator of the innovation and research Group Education&Gender-UAB.

Abstract: Education and Gender: Experiences from Feminist Pedagogies in the field of Education

In our current society there are still many challenges to face such as the androcentric perspective in all knowledge domains or the increase of violence against women and marginalized collectives such as the LGTBIQ+. Recent discourses pointed education as the key for the transformation. Consequently, new educational policies, legislation and programs are being unfold nowadays with the purpose to mainstream gender education and the so-called comprehensive sexuality education (UNESCO, 2019), as it is understood as the motor for an improvement in gender equality and decrease of sexist violence.

Spain and Chile are undergoing a parallel process in this regard. On the one hand, Chile had in 2015 an educational reform which incorporates gender perspective and sexuality education in the educational curricula in the different levels of the educational system. On the other hand, in Spain, the Organic law for the Effective Equality of Women and Men and the application of the 2030 Agenda stablishes specifically the integration of gender equality in educational policies (article 24) and gender equality in higher education. At a regional level in Catalonia the law “Effective Equality among Men and Women” as well reinforces the main role of education and therefore the program COEDUCA’T has been designed to train educational agents in all levels of the educational system. Finally, the new Spanish educational law (LOMLOE, 2020) for the first time aims specifically to foster equality among men and women and prevent gender violence.

Academia is side by side with the political changes and challenges; therefore, research collaborations have been carried between Chile and Spain to study, diagnose and propose the path towards the inclusion of gender perspective in the different educational levels, from primary to higher education.

In both countries, one of the main goals is the training of educators, the detection of gender biases in educational environments and the technical and pedagogical guidance for the educational community. These main goals need to be feed with new contextualized research to improve educators training and foster the change of paradigm towards gender equality.

We present an overview of different studies carried in the field of gender and education and gender policies in higher education, that identify, diagnose, and propose how gender perspective in education is included in the different educational levels.

Valeria Breull

Psicóloga de la Universidad Diego Portales, Diplomada en Convivencia Escolar por la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile y Magíster en Investigación en Educación por la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona. Se desempeña como Investigadora de proyecto en la Universidad Diego Portales y Psicóloga Educativa en la Fundación Niñas Valientes de Chile. Sus áreas de trabajo se centran en la convivencia escolar, la inclusión y la educación no sexista.

Abstract: Education and Gender: Experiences from Feminist Pedagogies in the field of Education

In our current society there are still many challenges to face such as the androcentric perspective in all knowledge domains or the increase of violence against women and marginalized collectives such as the LGTBIQ+. Recent discourses pointed education as the key for the transformation. Consequently, new educational policies, legislation and programs are being unfold nowadays with the purpose to mainstream gender education and the so-called comprehensive sexuality education (UNESCO, 2019), as it is understood as the motor for an improvement in gender equality and decrease of sexist violence.

Spain and Chile are undergoing a parallel process in this regard. On the one hand, Chile had in 2015 an educational reform which incorporates gender perspective and sexuality education in the educational curricula in the different levels of the educational system. On the other hand, in Spain, the Organic law for the Effective Equality of Women and Men and the application of the 2030 Agenda stablishes specifically the integration of gender equality in educational policies (article 24) and gender equality in higher education. At a regional level in Catalonia the law “Effective Equality among Men and Women” as well reinforces the main role of education and therefore the program COEDUCA’T has been designed to train educational agents in all levels of the educational system. Finally, the new Spanish educational law (LOMLOE, 2020) for the first time aims specifically to foster equality among men and women and prevent gender violence.

Academia is side by side with the political changes and challenges; therefore, research collaborations have been carried between Chile and Spain to study, diagnose and propose the path towards the inclusion of gender perspective in the different educational levels, from primary to higher education.

In both countries, one of the main goals is the training of educators, the detection of gender biases in educational environments and the technical and pedagogical guidance for the educational community. These main goals need to be feed with new contextualized research to improve educators training and foster the change of paradigm towards gender equality.

We present an overview of different studies carried in the field of gender and education and gender policies in higher education, that identify, diagnose, and propose how gender perspective in education is included in the different educational levels.

Diana Marre

PhD. Associate Professor at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She is specialized in social and cultural aspects of assisted reproduction (assisted reproductive technologies, surrogacy, and adoption) and parenting in Spain. She leads the AFIN Research Group and Centre (a multi-disciplinary research group at the UAB) and a research and development coordinated project financed by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness on cross-border reproductive journeys. She co-edited the book International Adoption: Global Inequalities and the Circulation of Children (2009, New York University Press) and the Special Issue Governança Reproductiva (2021, Horizontes Antropológicos 6) and co-authored the The Routledge Handbook of Anthropology and Reproduction’s chapter Adoption and Fostering (2021, Routledge).

Abstract: Infertility: A lack of sex education?

Pending abstract.

María Fernanda Peraza

Andrologist, Spain.

Abstract: Hacia una masculinidad saludable: aportes de la andrología para una educación sexual y reproductiva temprana

El diseño de la educación sexual actual y la forma de abordar la reproducción como función biológica en nuestra sociedad forman parte importante del constructo de la masculinidad que actualmente percibimos, una masculinidad que no da permiso social a la vulnerabilidad y que se refleja incluso en el ámbito de la medicina sexual y reproductiva.

Joyce Harper

Joyce Harper is an author, academic, scientist and educator. She is Professor of Reproductive Science at University College London in the Institute for Women’s Health where she is Head of the Reproductive Science and Society Group. She is a Director of the Embryology and PGD Academy which delivers an online certificate in clinical embryology and founder of Global Women Connected.

She has worked in the fields of fertility, genetics and reproductive science since 1987, written over 200 scientific papers and published three books. She started her career as an embryologist, then moved into reproductive science and genetics. Now she is researching into fertility education, FemTech, IVF add-ons, gamete donation and the menopause.

Further information – www.joyceharper.com

Follow on Twitter, Instagram, Tiktok and Linkedin - @ProfJoyceHarper

Abstract: Why we have to teach reproductive health in school

Reproductive health includes puberty, the menstrual cycle, fertility, infertility, pregnancy, and the menopause. Historically these topics are rarely covered in school education in any detail. For those countries that deliver sex education, it usually concentrates on how not to get pregnant and how not to get a sexually transmitted infection.


We have formed the International Fertility Education Initiative, a multidisciplinary group of experts working in reproductive health education and research (www.eshre.eu/ifei). Our mission is ‘To increase fertility awareness using the life course approach, in order to improve reproductive health and facilitate decision-making in family planning among adolescents, people of reproductive age, primary healthcare, education professionals, and policymakers through development, evaluation and dissemination of inclusive educational resources.’


Reproductive health education is not just for women; it is for all, including the LGBTQ+ community. Our school study has shown that young people want to ensure that education is LGBTQ+ inclusive. Some of this information is important even for those who do not want children. Menstrual cycle education should include information on ovulation and periods, what is a normal menstrual cycle, and what can go wrong, including endometriosis and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Our study in UK schools show that the vast majority of students have not learnt about these issues, but 1 in 10 women will get endometriosis or PCOS.


Understanding the fertile window is important for all who menstruate but especially for those trying to conceive. It is also important to know that female fertility declines with age, especially after age 35. We are seeing a delay in the age of the birth of the first child globally, being over age 30 in many countries. We are also seeing a decrease in the total fertility rate (the average number of children a woman will have). This has reached 1.3 in several European countries. Our studies have shown that the majority of people who want children, want between 2 and 3 children. This would indicate that the majority of people are not having their desired family size.


Infertility affects a growing number of people, and it is key that people know the limitations of fertility treatment, costs, etc. Our studies have found that most people stop fertility treatment due to emotional reasons.


Preconception health, for both men and women, is key to fertility, a healthy pregnancy and the health of our future children. Many people do not realise how common miscarriage is.


We have carried out extensive research on the menopause and many women are entering this key stage in their lives with no knowledge. Understanding what the menopause is, the symptoms, and treatments are key for all women and should start in schools. A way to engage menopause discussions with young people is to stress that they will know someone going through the menopause and to relate the menopause to the changes they experience during puberty.


Reproductive health education for all is necessary, starting in schools and continuing throughout life. Young people want to learn about these topics and to think about their reproductive future.

Avril Louise Clarke

Avril Louise Clarke, MA (she/her)

Clinical Sexologist, Community Relations & Education Manager, The Porn Conversation & Erika Lust

Avril is a clinical sexologist and the community relations and education manager of the non-profit project, The Porn Conversation, which provides comprehensive sex education tools for families and educators to educate young people at home and in school – beginning with the topic of porn literacy. Find out more about The Porn Conversation at www.thepornconversation.org and @thepconversation on Instagram.

Abstract: Why We Need to Have The Porn Conversation

From an early age, children are regularly exposed to sexualised images. When young people don’t have access to age-appropriate and evidence-informed sex education from trusted sources and adults, they are left to learn about sex through what they find online, which in many cases, is porn.

Having The Porn Conversation encourages young people to critically think about the content they consume – and to question the messages it sends through the use of a porn literacy framework to guide discussions at home and in schools.